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Building Our Legacy Together: When Good Archives Go Bad 

Conflicting opinions over what documents are important can create hard feelings between the donors of archives and the archivists who process them. The New York Times reports such a contretemps between author and reporter Paul Brodeur and the New York Public Research Library. Brodeur donated his archives in 320 boxes to NYPL-R when he left …

Posted 97 months ago by

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Building Our Legacy Together: Eliminate The Unnecessary 

"The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak." --Hans Hofmann An archive is a purposefully-assembled collection of records intended to tell a story to future researchers. Emptying file drawers into an archive actually inhibits the effectiveness of the archive by obstructing access to key documents with a surfeit …

Posted 98 months ago by

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Building Our Legacy Together: History Will Be Kind To Me… 

"History will be kind to me for I intend to write it." --Winston Churchill Each office, faculty member, staff member and student has the opportunity to use PocketKnowledge to create an archive. The goal of an archive is to preserve and make accessible the records that comprise the history of an institution. The archive tells …

Posted 98 months ago by

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Historic Juvenile Collection: Victorian Children’s Literature 

One of my favorite descriptions of Victorian times is expressed through The Kinks' album, Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire) It’s not that Dickens, or the Bronte sisters don't do a good job, but it takes them hundreds of pages to say what Ray Davies said in 16 words. ”Long ago …

Posted 99 months ago by

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Historic Juvenile Collection: Fairy Tales 

Magic spells, glass slippers, talking animals and feisty ogres…this is the stuff many fairy tales are made of. Surprisingly, perhaps, to some of us, fairy tales weren’t always popular and weren’t always for children. Some of my former blog posts have illustrated examples of “appropriate” books for children in the 1600 and 1700s - mostly …

Posted 100 months ago by

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Make John Dewey your Facebook friend… 

Two days ago, a friend of mine posted on her wall that she and John Dewey were now facebook friends... Ohhhhkaaaayy. I called her to check if she was doing well and if the stress and cold of the season had actually gotten to her...but she was quite sane and said, "no really, see for …

Posted 100 months ago by

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On stairs, dents, and photographs 

A few weeks ago, while walking down the stairs from the fourth floor of Russell Hall, I noticed something.  I hadn't noticed it before, maybe because I don't look down much while walking down stairs, although I probably should, given that I always seem to have my brain focused on my phone as I roam …

Posted 100 months ago by

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Nonsense Poetry: Edward Lear’s contribution to Historical Children’s Literature 

Nonsense Poetry This post, intended to delight and entertain, will focus on nonsense poetry, mostly the limericks of Edward Lear. Lear was a British poet well known for his humorous poems, such as The Owl and the Pussycat, and as the creator of the form and meter of the modern limerick. Nonsense poetry is a …

Posted 101 months ago by

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The Most Wonderful Time of the Year 

Seasons Greetings! Below find a quick list of some great holiday reads. I’m sure many of these are familiar, so I’ve included additional information to present some of these classics in a new light.  Here’s to hoping you find some time after finals to enjoy them, and many other holiday indulgences here in New York …

Posted 102 months ago by

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Building Our Legacy Together: Why Bother? 

"A great deal is said by some people about 'rubbish,' but one investigator's 'rubbish' may be precious to another, and what appears valueless to-day may be found highly important tomorrow." American historian Justin H. Smith (1857-1930) The archives exists to acquire, preserve and make available vital records that document the College. An archive fosters a …

Posted 102 months ago by

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Good Advice from the Howland family 

My most recent journey through TC’s collection of historic children's  literature has led me to the early 1850’s, Worcester, Massachusetts. Good Advice for Boys and Girls was published by Southworth Allen (S.A.) Howland, a printer and direct descendant of John Allen, one of the original passengers aboard the Mayflower.  The image on the book cover …

Posted 102 months ago by

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The McLoughlin Bros. of New York 

The McLoughlin Bros. were a New York based publisher of children’s books from 1828-1920. They were known for implementing innovative color printing techniques in their children’s books. The stories they published were often “bowdlerizations” or retellings of well known children’s stories but they also published religious, moralist and other education texts. (Bowdlerizations are considered to …

Posted 103 months ago by

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The First Children’s Book 

As a TC intern and future librarian, I spend a fair amount of time looking for things at the library.  It will probably come as no surprise to any of you to find out that TC has an incredible collection of historical children’s literature.  Thinking you too may be curious to see what lives in …

Posted 104 months ago by

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Floppy Drives 

Hey, do you remember when Clinton was in the Oval Office, when scientists unraveled the human genome, when boy bands roamed the earth? Exciting times! Well if you remember these trivial nuggets of historical knowledge you may be in the generation that remembers the floppy disk. Not as a novelty coaster, or a conveniently shaped …

Posted 104 months ago by

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Building Our Legacy Together 

Everyone at Teachers College can archive their work with PocketKnowledge (PK), an easy to use institutional archive. This is a great way to make your work part of the life of the College. But, you ask, what constitutes the life of a college? What documents best convey the rich history and unique perspective of the world's …

Posted 104 months ago by

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Panasonic RP-2692 Foot Pedal 

In this digital world, it's hip to be analog. This series will highlight some technology from the library's vaults--oldies but goodies--still available for use. Today's find is an S-Video Panasonic RP-2692 foot pedal, which is used with a Panasonic RR-830 transcriber device. For those who don't know what I am talking about (I sure didn't until I researched …

Posted 104 months ago by

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Found! Postcards from the Past 

Some vintage postcards depicting Teachers College many moons ago were unearthed from some crevice of the 5th Floor and landed on my desk Monday morning. I wanted to share them here, as well as on Pocket Knowledge, TC's digital archive. I love the retro "Post Card" script on the back, as well as the …

Posted 106 months ago by

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The Faculty Song of the Class of 1906 Illustrated with Historic Photographs from the Teachers College Archives 

Oh! She came up to College just for fun, But found before her work was done 'T was no loafing place up here. Chorus: No loafing place up here-- Teachers College-- No loafing place up here; She went to the Dean to plead her case But the  Dean cried out, "No loafing place-- No loafing …

Posted 106 months ago by

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Student Life 100 Years Ago: No Loafing Place Up Here 

"Oh! She came up to College just for fun But found before her work was done T was no loafing place up here. No loafing place up here -- Teachers College" -- Faculty Song, 1906 The exuberance of Teachers College student life has always extended beyond the classroom. Each class organized itself around a slate …

Posted 106 months ago by

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Russell Hall: The New Library 

Building a new library for the rapidly growing college was delayed first by World War I and then again in 1919 by the purchase of the Bancroft apartment building on 121st Street and the Janus Court building on Morningside Drive. Janus Court was renamed in honor of Columbia University president, Seth Low. When plans were …

Posted 107 months ago by

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