Chronicle of Higher Ed answers: What technology do students really value?

| September 6, 2012

The Chronicle of Higher Education just published its Almanac of Higher Education for 2012. A veritable joy for data mongers now and (perhaps more so) in the future, data collected over last academic year across the U.S. are broken down into seven categories: The Profession, Student Demographics, Access & Equity, Finance, Technology, International, and States.

The technology section is of particular interest to the TC community, and some of the data are somewhat surprising. ¬†This graphic shows students’ opinions on technology used in the classroom, showing a range of tech tools and how many students rated them as “extremely valuable” and their professors’ use of them in the classroom as “extremely effective.” As expected, a laptop and wi-fi were highly rated as both extremely valuable and extremely effective in classroom use, while webcams and smartpens are rated lower. A more surprising finding is that iPads/other tablets and music listening devices were given pretty low ratings compared to other devices. It’s important to note, however, that this graphic charts results only for the highest ratings of “extremely valuable” and extremely effective, leaving readers to wonder what technologies were handed good, solid ratings of “valuable” and “effective.”

But this little chart is just a tiny portion of a wealth of information out there in the Almanac. The technology site alone links to ¬†data such as the use of mobile apps in colleges, Learning Management Systems used in higher ed, and student ownership of high-tech devices. Don’t miss the article that breaks down all the technology news for the year as well: Leaders Look to Digital Tools for Savings, and Reinvention.