Today in History: WW1 Begins

| July 28, 2016

160725_news_219x365Did you know that on July 28, 1914 Austria and Hungary declared war on Serbia? For, one month to the day, the assassination in Sarajevo of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne, by Gavrilo Princip, a Yugoslav nationalist, had triggered one of the deadliest conflicts in human history. Germany invaded Belgium, Luxembourg, and France; Austria and Hungary invaded Serbia; Russia attacked Prussia; and more countries became involved, forming the Allies and Central Powers of World War I. Within four years, 15 million people had died.

By the end of the Great War, the Germans and Russians were defeated; the Austrian-Hungarian and Ottomon Empires had collapsed; Central Europe was re-mapped; and the League of Nations was formed to help prevent a future re-occurrence.

What do the newspapers of the day reveal about the tide of opinions and sentiments concerning the start of the First World War? How would politics and military history pan out in the decades to come? And why would conflict on a massive global scale never be repeated… a third time?

The following articles take us back in time to the beginning of the first World War, allowing us look back in hindsight. Headlines are drawn from Proquest Historical Newspapers, a resources which serves to inspire research, as well as classroom learning and teaching.

Tip: See the Rothman Lantern Slide Collection on Pocketknowledge for images of the world wars and browse Educat, the catalog, under the subject heading “World War, 1914-1918” for related holdings.

Also enjoy “WW1 Finding a Frame of Reference“,  among other pieces tagged as “News Displays“, on Learning at the Library.

slide design-World War I Begins-03

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Need to keep current, look to the past, teach a topic? The Everett Cafe features daily postings of news from around the world, and also promotes awareness of historical events from an educational context.

See here for upcoming announcements concerning special news displays in August.